Kate Allan

The online diary of Kate Allan, author

Monday, March 28, 2005

Greenwood's Map of London 1827

I’ve been putting together a list of internet sources which I’ve found valuable over the last few years of writing Regency-set novels for my talk next weekend.

One, which deserves a special mention, is
Greenwood's Map of London 1827. My sister, who was curled up yesterday with a Georgette Heyer, was asking me about Regency Grosvenor Square. Look here. The middle of the square is laid out in a circular formal garden with cross-crossing paths and a circular path around the edge.

I especially like the way you can see the mews in the West End and that they are named, that you can see the features of Hyde Park – such as the statue of Achilles and the Serpentine – so decent sized a lake I’m amazed more Regency heroines haven’t half-drowned in it.

In 1827 you could have walked up
Wellington Street and across Waterloo Bridge. Or visited Earls Court farm or the village of Kensington. And the Finchley Road was still only a proposal.

Writing:
Yes, I beat my writing goal for the holiday weekend! Unfortunately the rest of this week I won't be doing much writing. I need to finish reading Flashman on the March (It's great so not a chore. I read 50 pages on Saturday and was laughing out loud), write and send a review for it and another book to the Historical Novels Review, and write my talk for Sunday, which I ain't done yet.

BIRDS progress update:
Words written: 21,561
Words to go: 88,439

2 Comments:

  • At 11:18 pm, Blogger Tess said…

    Kate - I LOVE Greenwood's map. It's so cool. I could lose myself at that site indefinitely *g*. Just wish I knew how much different London was 34 years earlier, when my story is set. I THINK I've found maps of London from that period, but not as nicely done online as Greenwood's.

    Good luck with writing your talk for next weekend :-) Do you have a topic yet?

     
  • At 8:22 am, Anonymous Kate Hardy said…

    Brilliant resource - and much better done than some of the regional maps from the period.

    Hope the talk goes well!

     

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